Stefania Forcinici, PhD

Nanotechnology Institute - National Research Council (NANOTEC -Cnr)

WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND?

I started my journey in “science” as a Bachelor student in 2008. Science means knowledge and improvement, The world of science has always incredibly fascinated me and for this reason I chose to study Biology, obtaining my Master Degree at the University of Bari in 2014. Thereafter, I achieved the PhD in Biomolecular Medicine at the University of Verona in 2017. During these years, I studied the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer initiation and progression, focusing on the characterization of the biological features of pancreatic cancer stem cells. From March to September 2017, I joined the laboratory of “Stem Cell in Cancer & Aging” led by Prof. Christopher Heeschen at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI, London, UK), where I continued to study the effect of new therapeutic strategies on patient-derived pancreatic cancer stem cells. On September 2019, I started a post-doctoral fellowship under the supervisor of Dr. Luigi Laghi at the Humanitas Clinical and Research Center in Milan (IT) where I conducted a translational research activity focused on the genotyping of genetic variants as modifier of pancreatic cancer progression and on their involvement in host immune response. Since September 2020, I started a prestigious ERC-founded postdoctoral fellowship at the Institute of Nanotechnology of CNR (CNR NANOTEC) under the supervisor of Dr. Loretta del Mercato.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO DO RESEARCH ON PANCREATIC CANCER?

I started by chance when my thesis supervisor encouraged me to work on 3D in vitro models of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive and difficult to be treated neoplasms. From that moment I realized that there are poorly understood mechanisms driving this disease and they must be clarified in order to identify possible treatment strategies. For this reason, I decided to work every day with tenacity and constancy to learn more about this “silent killer” and be able to give patients the hope of fighting together.

WHAT IS YOUR RESEARCH ABOUT?

My research project is part of the prestigious ERC-Starting Grant project INTERCELLMED (Sensing CELL-cell INTERaction heterogeneity in 3D tumor models: towards precision MEDicine).
I’m working on the development of 3D in vivo-like culture systems that mimic the pancreatic tumor microenvironment coupled with sensing particles for measuring intracellular and extracellular concentration of key biological analytes (i.e pH, oxygen, K+). Through live imaging and computational analyses we study tumor-stroma interactions and quantify of drugs efficacy.

WHAT ARE THE RESERCH PERSPECTIVES AND THE IMPACT OF YOUR WORK?

Our 3D-in vitro culture systems engineered with sensing particles will be used for culturing patient-derived tumor cells and for evaluating their response to different anticancer drugs.
This approach is oriented towards precision medicine and represents a predictive model of patients’ response to personalized treatments.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO BE PART OF THE IPCC?

Being part of the Italian Pancreatic Cancer Community is a great opportunity that allows to meet and interact with national and international researchers who, like me, work on pancreatic cancer. Ours is a team work, therefore the promotion of collaborations and the exchange of viewpoints is essential to advance knowledge on pancreatic cancer..

WHEN YOU ARE NOT IN YOUR LAB WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO? 

During my free time, I love to walk and visit new places. I like cooking, especially making cakes.
I love shopping, it relaxes me a lot!

 

Sabrina D’Agosto, PhD

Università di Verona

Sabrina D'Agostino

WHAT IS YOUR BACKGROUND?

I started my journey in “science” as a Bachelor student in 2008. Science means knowledge and improvement, that is why I decided to continue my education by enrolling into Pharmaceutic Biotechnology Course at University of Perugia. I was fortunate to conduct my PhD thesis project in the laboratory of Diagnostic and Public Health, under the supervisor of Dr Claudio Bassi from 2014 to 2016. During these years, I had the possibility to join the laboratory of “Stem Cell in Cancer & Aging” led by Christopher Heeschen at the Barts Cancer Institute (BCI, London, UK) from September 2015 to August 2016. At the BCI, I got interested in using different murine preclinical models of pancreatic cancer to characterize cancer stem cells. Back to Verona, I completed my PhD and started on July 2017 a post-Doctoral fellowship under the supervisor of Dr. Vincenzo Corbo and Prof. Aldo Scarpa. In 2020, I won a prestigious fellowship from AIRC (Italian Association for Cancer Research), a great honor and opportunity.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO DO RESEARCH ON PANCREATIC CANCER?

It all started a little by chance or by destiny. I arrived in Verona in 2014, as a winner of a PhD scholarship and I started working with in vitro models of pancreatic cancer, one of the most lethal among malignant neoplasms. Confronting this reality every day, I realized that there is still a lot to do to find a cure and give patients a perspective on life. This is the reason why I decided to work and do research on pancreatic cancer: my passion for research and my tenacity led me to strongly believe that pancreatic cancer can be defeated.

WHAT IS YOUR RESEARCH ABOUT?

I worked on establishing and characterizing three-dimensional models, called organoids, of pancreatic cancer. This research is part of an important international initiative in which we participate alongside Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, called the Human Cancer Model Initiative. It is a consortium that aims to make tumor organoids derived from various lesions (pancreatic, breast, colon and lung cancer) available to the scientific community.

WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM YOUR RESEARCH  ON ORGANOIDS?

First of all, this research has made it possible to generate a large number of three-dimensional models from pancreatic cancer patients, giving the opportunity to establish organoids from different stages of the disease. This has allowed us to characterize them at the molecular and histopathological level and to understand how they are valid and innovative models for the study of the disease.

WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF USING THIS MODEL?

Organoids represent a major advance in personalized cancer medicine. Most patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas die from the disease because there are currently no effective treatments. Through the systematic analysis of three-dimensional ductal models of the pancreas, we are trying to identify new therapeutic targets that will help us take an important step forward in the treatment of the disease.

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO BE PART OF THE IPCC?

Being part of the Italian Pancreatic Cancer Community is an important opportunity for people like me who have been working on pancreatic cancer for many years. In fact, it offers the opportunity to interact and collaborate with other centers of excellence (national and international) which, like ours, have been working for years on  making progress in the study of pancreatic cancer.

WHEN YOU ARE NOT IN YOUR LAB WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DO? 

Work takes up most of my day, but I manage in any way to carve out spaces to cultivate my passions. In my free time I like to cook, because it helps to relax and at the same time gives me satisfaction, especially when I cook for others. I also like to go running and do physical activity in general.